Job Announcement: Program Manager

Greensboro Bound seeks a Program  Manager who will be responsible for the management and coordination of Greensboro Bound Literary Festival and other organizational programming. We are seeking a detail-oriented individual with outstanding planning and operational management skills, strong communications skills, and the willingness and ability to work effectively with board members, volunteers, sponsors/donors, and community partners.

For more information check out the full job ad:

Authors Engaging Students: The Fall 2019 Line up

Authors Engaging Students: The Fall 2019 Line up

We are in our third year of our AES Program, and we are delighted and grateful for the authors who have agreed to go into our local schools and work with students. Greensboro Bound donates copies of the authors’ books to the schools’ library. Stay tuned for AES updates and hear what the kids say! For now, check out this list of amazing writers and their books. Request their books from your local indie bookstore.

Tanya Zabinski–Peace, Love, Action!: Everyday Acts of Goodness from A to Z

Alicia D. Williams–Genesis Begins Again

Jo  Watson Hackl–Smack Dab in the Middle of Maybe 

Kelly Starling Lyons–Going Down Home With Daddyand the Jada Jones series

Amy Reed–The Boy and Girl Who Broke the World

Jeremy Whitley–Princelessgraphic novel series and Rainbow Britegraphic novel

Matt Myers–Hum and Swish

Chris Giarrusso–G-Manseries, The G-Man Super Journal: Awesome Origins

Corrie Wang–City of Beasts

Dhonielle Clayton–The Belles

Our Resident Artists for #GreensboroBound19

Our Resident Artists for #GreensboroBound19

In its second year, Greensboro Bound has launched a Resident Artists program designed to bring together literature and visual arts. Greensboro Bound’s resident artists will circulate among festival participants on Saturday, May 18, creating work that reflects the spirit and energy of the festival. Festival participants will have the opportunity to witness the artists as they work and interact with them as they conduct their projects.

In coordination with local partners in the arts—Elsewhere and the Center for Visual Artists—Greensboro Bound has selected the artists in residence for the inaugural year of the program: Burlington-based artist Hannah Barnhardt, and Greensboro-based photographer RJ Hooker.

Hannah Barnhardt is a visual artist working in illustrations, sketches, watercolor, and photographs. Her ongoing reportage project is based in the creation of live drawings. “I collect a lot of material for illustrative work from observing the world and drawing scenes like a reporter,” says Barnhart. For the festival, Barnhardt will produce large-format work that creates a real-time response to panel presentations.

RJ Hooker is a photographer whose work blends a documentary approach with close portraiture. Says Hooker, “I’m interested in amassing and displaying a record of direct, black and white portraits that speak to the diversity and humanity of Greensboro.” Hooker intends to work with as many different participants in the festival as possible, from attendees to volunteers to presenters. For his project at Greensboro Bound, Hooker will work in monochrome film and develop exposures through a traditional darkroom process.

Festival participants will have the opportunity to witness Barnhardt and Hooker at work, converse with them about their projects, and become part of their art throughout the full day of programming on Saturday, May 18. The resident artists will be working throughout the festival footprint—look for them at Scuppernong Books, the Triad Stage Cabaret, the International Civil Rights Center & Museum, the Cultural Center, the Greensboro History Museum, and the Greensboro Central Library.

Jason Reynolds is Coming to Greensboro

Jason Reynolds is Coming to Greensboro

written by Gale Greenlee

The countdown continues to Greensboro Bound, May 16-19. And this week, we’re hosting someone special. Jason Reynolds, author of the YA novel, When I Was the Greatest and the middle grade series Ghost, will take the mic Wednesday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the Union Square Auditorium (124 East Gate City Blvd. in Greensboro). The 35-year-old Washington-D.C. native is on a mission to “not write boring books” and to get “book haters,” especially “book-hating boys” to read. So, when Reynolds comes town, his publisher will donate more than 500 books to a local Title 1 school, and, of course, he’ll read.

If you know about the #WeNeedDiverseBooks movement, you know his name. He has twelve books to date, and he writes everything from poetry and prose, to a Marvel comic novel Miles Morales: Spider-Man. But if you’re not checking for middle grade or YA lit, especially books that reflect black communities, you may not understand all the hype. Trust me: Reynolds is a big deal. New York Times bestselling author. NAACP Image Award winner. National Book Award finalist. And author of BuzzFeed’s Best YA Book of the Year for his new novel-in-verse, Long Way Down. The book—a gripping story of a 15-year-old who wants revenge for his brother’s death—mixes family, ghosts, and gun violence in the most surreal 60-second elevator ride you’ll ever take. For that book, Publisher’s Weekly calls him “an exceptionally perceptive chronicler of what it means to be a black teen in America.” I just call him “real.”

One minute, he’s got you low-key chuckling or laughing out loud, and the next, your stomach sits in tangles, and you wanna weep—because he feels you. He gets you. Reynolds’s stories look at you, lock eyes, and linger while you shift uncomfortably in your seat, sucker punched by whatever ugly-but-oh-so-real truth his characters’ lives reveal. Characters with rough edges and soft hearts. Kids who cuss and posture. Folk, often unseen and ignored, who act hard but love even harder.

No matter the struggle, Reynolds will cut to the pain, but he’ll also unveil some joy. He unapologetically wraps his pen around black people and communities. Then, he holds us in respect and love. His stories whisper to those who feel invisible, “I see you. No, for real. I see you.” Each book is a beautifully crafted love letter to black youth. To black boys. To black girls. To black childhoods and to those who know the gift of community. For that alone, he has this reader’s gratitude and heart.

Yeah, Jason Reynolds is a big deal y’all. But news flash: he thinks you are too. So to book haters and booklovers alike, don’t miss out. He’s looking for you.

You can learn more about Jason at https://www.jasonwrites.com, and you can follow him on Twitter @JasonReynolds83.

Catching Up with GB18 Authors

Catching Up with GB18 Authors

Here at Greensboro Bound, we take pleasure in bringing you, not only authors you’ve read and loved, but writers you will love WHEN you read. Sometimes, we showcase emerging or underrepresented authors because we want to encourage a sense of adventure and an ever-expanding literary landscape.

We like to celebrate the success of our Festival authors and cheer as their books make their way into the wider world reaching broader audiences, sometimes changing shape to become songs, movies, or television shows.

In the week before we announce our 2019 line-up, we thought we’d share a partial list of some of the successes of 2018 Greensboro Bound authors over the last year.

Nikki Giovanni has not slowed down, even at 76. Read this interview with her from earlier this year in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

Eddie Huffman, author of John Prine: In Spite of Himself, is working on a new book about Doc Watson.

Emilia Philips’ new collection, Hemlock, was recently published by Diode Editions.

Jim Minick has an essay titled How to Make Cornbread, or Thoughts on Being an Appalachian from Pennsylvania Who Calls Virginia Home but Now Lives in Georgia in Appalachian Reckoning: A Region Responds to Hillbilly Elegy from West Virginia University Press.

Wayne Johns released his debut collection of poetry, Antipsalms, from Unicorn Press.

Hal Crowther’s Freedom Fighters and Hell Raisers was published by Blair. You can read the Publishers Weekly interview with Hal here.

Jessica Jacobs‘ collection, Take Me With You, Wherever You’re Going, was published by Four Way Books.

To Those Who Were Our First Gods, by Nickole Brown, was a Rattle Chapbook Series Selection.

Ashley Lumpkin published I Hate You All Equally: A Collection of Conversations and the Bull City Slam Team was a semifinalist at the National Poetry Slam.

Steve Mitchell has been book-busking in small towns with guitarist Ben Singer and recording Cloud Diary with live music. Cloud Diary was shortlisted for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award.

Beth Macy previewed Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America at last year’s festival before it was published. Her book has gone on to be a New York Times Bestseller, The New York Times Top 5 Books of the Year, on the Chicago Tribune and Washington Post Best Books of the Year lists, and it’s been optioned for film.

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo, one of our UNDOCUPoets, published a new collection, Dulce, with Northwestern University Press and has recently completed his memoir, Children of the Land

Stacy McAnulty’s SUN! One in a Billion was named a Junior Library Guild Selection.

Dan Pink’s book, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing became a New York Times and Washington Post bestseller.

Carmen Maria Machado’s work was featured in Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, Best American Essay 2018, and Best American Short Story 2018. Her debut memoir, In the Dream House, will be published by Graywolf in October. Her short story collection, Her Body and Other Parties was optioned for television by FX.

 

Prelude To A Festival

Prelude To A Festival

“At the still point, there the dance is.” —T. S. Eliot

I haven’t introduced myself yet. I’m Deonna Kelli Sayed, the Festival Coordinator for Greensboro Bound. You may have seen me around downtown, or at the 2018 TEDx Greensboro, or behind the registration desk at a North Carolina Writers’ Network event.

I’m thrilled to meet you, and I’m glad you’re #GreensboroBound.

The T.S. Eliot quote above is considered to be one of the most beautiful sentences in the English language. Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t. At least, that’s what the Internet says. The Internet is known to be wrong, on occasion.

The sentiment expressed in the sentence, however, beautifully captures the muffled fury of A Prelude to a Festival: the four months prior to Greensboro Bound where our organizing machines quietly churn to deliver what will become four days of free programming during May 16-19, 2019.

Things may look still to you, but I assure you, things are anything but.

To plan a literary festival is a frenzy, at times. A joy! A clumsy dance! After all, we’re writers. We don’t know much about dancing.

To make a festival happen, it requires a troupe of donors, volunteers, community partners (like UNCG University Libraries), the City of Greensboro, lovers of cheese straws (more on that in a minute), an independent bookstore (Scuppernong Books), authors and readers who are enthusiastic to attend.

To make a festival happen takes blind faith, dumb luck, and nine months of honest work.

In the Beginning…

The very first Greensboro Bound meeting occurred in late 2017 over cheese straws and wine. A group of dedicated folks gathered and issued two very important edicts:

• Greensboro was getting a literary festival, dammit!
• Cheese Straws would henceforth be the official food of said festival.

(Perhaps the reader is unfamiliar with the Southern Cheese Straw. Again, the Internet offers its wisdom.)

A nonprofit, Greensboro Literary Organization (GLO) was formed. In less than nine months, we raised more than $120,000 and gathered together 80 authors, 5000 readers, and a few llamas for the May festival. Just so you know, a llama pooped in the library, much to the delight of the children. Every author received homemade Cheese Straws.

At Greensboro Bound, we take our edicts very seriously.

In the Fall of 2018, we curated a series, Immigration Stories, partially funded by support from the NC Humanities Council.  Another Greensboro Bound series, This Is Your Country On Drugs, featured Beth Macy, who also spoke during the 2018 festival. Greensboro Bound’s Authors Engaging Students program put authors in front of almost 6000 public school students in Guilford County, and we donated 500 books to classrooms and elementary school libraries. 

Listen, we weren’t kidding when we first huddled over cheese straws and declared that we wanted to organize literary stuff.

And now…

#GreensboroBound19 is happening. The official author reveal will drop during the first week in March. What I can share now: Zadie Smith is scheduled to deliver the Saturday night Keynote Address. Her presence at the festival is in partnership with the University of North Carolina Greensboro Libraries. Fred Chappell will perform with puppets, and young readers will enjoy interactive programming with Children and Young Adult authors.

As we enter our sophomore festival year, it’s time to introduce the motley assortment of writers and community-based individuals behind Greensboro Bound.

Author Hospitality and Green Room
• Ashley Sharkey | Greensboro Literary Organization Board
•Dabney Sanders | Greensboro Literary Organization Board | Project Manager at Downtown Greenway (Dabney is the maker of cheese straws, by the way.)

Author Engagement and Adult Programming Committee
• Dr. Gale Greenlee | Scholar on Black and Latinx girlhood and social change in Kids/YA literature
• Steve Mitchell | Author | Bookseller & Co-owner of Scuppernong Books
• Julia Ridley Smith | Author | University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Children and YA Programming Committee
• Cathy Bentsen | Retired Media Specialist with the Guilford County Public Schools
• Steve Colyer | Greensboro Literary Organization Board Member
• Dr. Gale Greenlee | Scholar on Black and Latinx girlhood and social change in Kids/YA literature
• Shannon Purdy Jones | Mom to Penny and Dominique | Bookseller at Scuppernong Books

Fundraising and Donation Relations
• Ashley Sharkey | Greensboro Literary Organization Board Member
• Cheryl Kersky | Experienced Fundraiser
• Dabney Sanders | Greensboro Literary Organization Board | Project Manager at Downtown Greenway
• Ellen Fisher | Children’s Author | Greensboro Bound’s Author Engaging Students Program
• Steve Colyer | Greensboro Literary Organization Board Member

Location Committee
• Glenn Perkins | Curator of Community History | Greensboro History Museum
• Andrew Saulters | Author | Owner & Publisher at Unicorn Press
• Marcia Woodward | Volunteer Extraordinaire for all sorts of Greensboro events

Vendor Liaison
• Wilson Lester | Greensboro Literary Organization Board Member | Executive Director of the Greensboro Community Development Fund

Volunteer Coordinator
• Paula Pierce | Board of Directors of Downtown Greensboro Incorporated

Prelude to Magic

I recall a subtle moment during last year’s festival. It was Saturday night when it felt too late to be called evening, but it wasn’t quite ready to become morning. The air, humid. A drizzle had colored the streets with a metallic sheen. A festival author stood on a Greensboro sidewalk and open her arms wide before she bellowed:

“I declare this city to be something grand!”

She put her arms down, hugged me, then said, “I love Greensboro!”
.
Her enthusiasm captured what many at Greensboro Bound felt during the festival weekend: the air seemed somehow changed, like the presence of writers had altered the cosmic alignment of downtown.

The volunteers listed above, as well as many others not yet named, will again turn downtown into something otherworldly during that third weekend in May. We hope to organize four days full of literary wonderment and awe. We hope that you, the reader, will be part of the magic.

Here’s to all the cheese straws we could possible eat between now and then.

See you soon.

Here’s some authors and audience members from last year: Carmen Maria Machado, Dan Pink, Nikki Giovanni, Lee Smith, audience members and lunchtime opera.

 

First Draft: Starting 2019 Write

First Draft: Starting 2019 Write

First Draft is a Greensboro Bound Open Mic that features diverse “curated readers” with an opportunity for others to read works-in-progress. Perfection is not required or even preferred. The goal is to bring writers together who otherwise might not be in the same room. All writers, all genders, all genres are encouraged.

Monday, Jan 7th is the next First Draft.  Throw your name in the First Draft Goblet for a chance for five minutes at the mic. The program starts at 7 pm, and the evening is mc’d by poet and performer, Ashley Lumpkin.

Curated Readers for First Draft, January 2019 

Photo by Francesco Campos-Lopez

Carol Roan holds B.M. in vocal pedagogy and an M.M. in voice performance from Indiana University, and was the first undergraduate recipient of The Performer’s Certificate in Voice. She also hold an M.S. in Business Policy from Columbia University Graduate School of Business in the Master’s Degree Program for Executives. She worked as an administrator for NEH seminars at Princeton University. She discovered a passion for writing when enrolled in a doctoral program in creative arts education at Rutgers University. She has since authored three books and co-edited three anthologies and have served as president of both Poets & Writers of NJ and Winston-Salem Writers.. Learn more about Carol here.

Brian Crean was born in Chicago and raised in Atlanta. He has lived and worked in Greensboro since 1997.  He received an MFA in Printmaking and Sculpture from UNCG in 1999 and has been an arts columnist and freelance contributor to the Greensboro News & Record, Yes Weekly, and Triad City Beat.  His photography was included in WFDD’s annual calendar in 2008, and his loft at Historic Wafco Mills has been featured in Preservation Greensboro’s Tour of Historic Homes and O.Henry Magazine.  Brian currently works as the Registrar & Account Manager at ECS Conservation, where he helps facilitate the restoration of rare books, documents, and artwork on paper.  Brian travels often and posts his photography and philosophical essays on his website: Stillbook.

Dr. Carrie Y. T. Kholi (more fondly known as khoLi.) is an educator; a poet and scholar; an entrepreneur;  a strategist. She earned a B.A. in English Arts and Creative Writing from Hampton University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Literatures in English from Rutgers.  in khoLi.’s career, she’s combined creativity, digital content, literature, theory and a dash of pop culture to create campaigns, content, curriculum, experimental marketing and scalable operations systems supporting the development of deepened community connection and an equitable future. She currently serves as the Co-Founder and Executive Director of HOLI. Brands, where she and a set of shrewd accomplices work to make the future now. Check out her site.

Students at the Newcomers School Read

Students at the Newcomers School Read

In 2017, students from the Doris Henderson Newcomers School created two volumes of poetry, stories, and artwork to document their immigrant experience. These volumes were titled, Resilience, and The Amazing World of Resilience. In this program, students from the Newcomers School will join us to read their stories and poems. They’ll be joined by teachers from the Newcomers School who will talk about the work they do and the special place the Newcomers School holds in the Guilford County School System.

Resilience and The Amazing World of Resilience will be on sale. Find out more about the Newcomers School here.

 

Being Stronger

by Claudia Herrera Frometa

Life is difficult

Sometimes we need to leave our countries,

People fall into depression

But We need to be strong.

Many people are here to support us

And help us start our new life

We have to believe in ourselves.

Life is beautiful!

Resistant people are those who are needed!

I would like to go back in time,

And value more the little things I had in my country

It is strange!

But strong always.

 

Claudia Herrera Frometa is a 14-year-old student from Cuba.

 

 

 

Immigration Stories, a joint project of Scuppernong Books and the Greensboro Bound Literary Festival, will explore the immigration and refugee experience in America through the lens of writing: fiction, non-fiction, and works for children. We’ll highlight the stories of the immigrant and refugee population as well as the issues, especially as they impact and affect the local community. Immigration Stories responds directly to these issues by providing the community with the opportunity to interact and engage in a series of public readings, panel discussions, and conversations with writers, scholars, and their neighbors. For more information, call 336-763-1919.

This project is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Community Conversation with Local Refugees and Immigrants

Community Conversation with Local Refugees and Immigrants

Community Conversation with

Local Refugees and Immigrants

Sunday, November 25 at 4pm   Congregational United Church of Christ

Refugees and Immigrants in our community tell their own stories of why and how they came to America and their experience of our country. There will be time for group conversations about the refugee experience and a chance to ask questions of the participants.

Diya Abdo is Associate Professor of English at Guilford College. Her scholarship focuses on Arab women writers and Arab and Islamic feminisms. She has published poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. A first generation Paelstinian, born and raised in Jordan, she is the founder and director of Every Campus A Refuge advocating for housing refugees on campus grounds and assisting them in resettlement. Thus far, Guilford College has hosted 42 refugees (23 of them children) from the Middle East and Africa and assisted them in resttlement in Greensboro. For her work on ECAR, Abdo was named a finalist in the Arab Hope Makers Award (2018) and has received service learning and civiv engagement in higher education awards.

Ali Al-Khasrachi and Marwa Azage came to the U.S. from Iraq in March of 2017. With their three young boys, they initially stayed on Guilford College’s campus through the Every Campus A Refuge program. Ali is an artist and calligraphist. You can read more about Ali’s artwork and the family’s story here.

Jennifer Nyirandikumana is 19 years old and is currently attending high school in Greensboro. She came with her family to the U.S. from Uganda in September 2017. They stayed on Guilford’s campus for a few months before moving to the apartments on Summit and Cone shortly before the fire that claimed 5 children’s lives in that complex occurred. Currently living in a new and safe location, you can read about her family’s story here.

Rev. Julie Peeples came to Congregational in late September of 1991, having served with
her husband, the Rev. Paul Davis, as chaplains for Habitat for Humanity International at
Habitat headquarters in Americus, Georgia. Her ministerial experience includes working with
homeless women in Boston, campus ministry at St. Vincent College near Pittsburgh, serving as a
Minister of Christian Education and Family Life in a large UCC church near Boston. She is a
driving force in immigration and social justice issues in Guilford County.

Abdoul Raoufou Ousmane came  from Central African Republic to Egypt when he was just 18 years old as refugee. After spending 17 years living and working in Egypt, Raouf was resettled to Greensboro this August. Raouf worked in Egypt with migrants and refugees for 9 years before coming here as  getting settle to USA as refugee. He worked with diverse community and in different fields as outreach, education coordinator and social worker.

Moises Serrano is an openly undocumented and queer activist and storyteller. Since coming out as undocumented in 2010 he has relentlessly pursued equality for his community through the sharing of his narrative. His mission is to de-criminalize and humanize the issue of migration while advocating for immediate relief to migrant communities. Moises quickly became one of the most requested speakers in the state of North Carolina. Described as a “consummate orator,” his advocacy has led him to lead a Tedx talk in Greensboro and to be named a notable Latino of the triad. Moises’ advocacy has been filmed in the feature length documentary, Forbidden: Undocumented & Queer in Rural America. The five-time award winning film was recently honored by the Television Academy. Forbidden was one of seven programs honored for creating awareness, enlightening, educating and/or positively motivating audiences. Moises officially became a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College in May of 2018.

Immigration Stories, a joint project of Scuppernong Books and the Greensboro Bound Literary Festival, will explore the immigration and refugee experience in America through the lens of writing: fiction, non-fiction, and works for children. We’ll highlight the stories of the immigrant and refugee population as well as the issues, especially as they impact and affect the local community. Immigration Stories responds directly to these issues by providing the community with the opportunity to interact and engage in a series of public readings, panel discussions, and conversations with writers, scholars, and their neighbors. For more information, call 336-763-1919.

This project is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

May-Lee Chai discusses Useful Phrases for Immigrants

May-Lee Chai discusses Useful Phrases for Immigrants

May-Lee Chai

Useful Phrases for Immigrants: Stories

Thursday, November 1 at 7pm   Scuppernong Books

With luminous prose and sharp-eyed observations, Chai reveals her characters’ hopes and fears, and our own: a grieving historian seeking solace from an old lover in Beijing, a young girl discovering her immigrant mother’s infidelity, workers constructing a shopping mall in central China who make a shocking discovery. Families struggle with long-held grudges, reinvent traditions, and make mysterious visits to shadowy strangers from their past—all rendered with economy and beauty.

With hearts that break and sometimes mend, with families who fight and sometimes forgive, the timely stories in Useful Phrases for Immigrants illuminate complicated lives with empathy and passion. Chai’s stories are essential reading for an increasingly globalized world.

“Chai’s stories alternate between depicting Chinese immigrants in the United States and migrants in China, reminding the reader of the ties between those who left their homelands and those who stayed. Immersive and complex, Chai’s characters confront questions about class, family, sexuality, love, longing and more. The sign of a strong collection is one where the stories work together to inform the reader, and Chai’s eight tales do just that.”

-Crystal Hana Kim, Washington Post

“Delving into fractured families, hoarded secrets, and the cultural and personal negotiations at the heart of the Asian American experience, May-lee Chai’s Useful Phrases for Immigrants is distinguished by writing as elegant and delicate as a snowflake.”

-Foreword Reviews

“The eight stories in this collection contain multitudes. May-lee Chai interrogates heavy subjects with a light touch. She grants each character the gift of a gleaming voice, rendering them as shaped by circumstances, while also transcending them. Useful Phrases for Immigrants is more than merely ‘useful’; this is essential reading.”

—Tayari Jones, author of An American Marriage, judge of the 2018 Bakwin Award for Writing by a Woman.

“The nightmare is always that there’s one story and then your family — or you — are compared to it,” says Chai. “I would hope that Asian American readers would appreciate the diversity of the different characters… and feel that there is space for their own story to be told as well.”

May-lee Chai is the author of ten books, including the memoir Hapa Girl, a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book; the novel Tiger Girl, which won an Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature; and her original translation from Chinese to English of the 1934 Autobiography of Ba Jin. Her award-winning short prose has been published widely, including in Glimmer TrainMissouri Review,SeventeenCrab Orchard ReviewThe RumpusZYZZYVADallas Morning NewsChristian Science Monitor, and San Francisco Chronicle. The recipient of an NEA fellowship in prose, Chai is an assistant professor in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University.

Immigration Stories, a joint project of Scuppernong Books and the Greensboro Bound Literary Festival, will explore the immigration and refugee experience in America through the lens of writing: fiction, non-fiction, and works for children. We’ll highlight the stories of the immigrant and refugee population as well as the issues, especially as they impact and affect the local community. Immigration Stories responds directly to these issues by providing the community with the opportunity to interact and engage in a series of public readings, panel discussions, and conversations with writers, scholars, and their neighbors. For more information, call 336-763-1919.

This project is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.